Preparing Claims

Are you heading for an unnecessary dispute?

I have just returned from a trip to central Asia to visit a client project where I was asked to review a number of claims and responses. The project is a very large one and the claims amount to an extension of time of almost one year and cost claims amounting to over US$100M. Our brief was to provideRead more


10 Tips to Ensure that your Claims are Accepted

ARCADIS have recently published their Global Construction Dispute Report 2019. The report says that the Number 1 reason for disputes in the Middle East is ‘Poorly drafted or incomplete and unsubstantiated claims’. So in light of this, we've put together a list of 10 things that you can do to get your claims accepted quickly and successfully:Read more


construction claims and disputes

Inadequately expressed claims: the second most frequent reason for disputes

Arcadis have recently published their Global Construction Dispute Report 2018. Unsurprisingly, “Poorly drafted or incomplete/unsubstantiated claims” is the second most frequent reason for disputes. This reason has ranked highly for several years, so it seems that the industry is not learning from its mistakes.

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From 2018 to 2019
the Beginnings of HDP...

The past twelve months have seen many changes in the Gulf region and some interesting events. In the following we look back and then ahead to what might come in 2019.

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The Four Corners of a Successful Claim

When preparing a claim, there are four key points to remember. Bill Bordill explains...

What is a claim?

Often folk think of ‘claim’ as a dirty word, something they ought not to get involved with. This is of course, in part, a result of the adverts you sometimes see on TV, ‘had an accident? Not your fault…’. But it is important to remember that a claim is only an assertion of a contractual right. It’s something you’re entitled to. It shouldn’t be seen as a dirty word.

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Get it Right First Time

We have recently reviewed several claims on a large project. Most have gone through two or more time-consuming (and costly) revisions. The reason is that after submission (based on information from the Contractor) the Contractor invariably does not agree with it. The Contractor then provides additional information or explanation. The Engineer has a responsibility to take this into account, so the assessment must be revised. Sometimes it has taken several months to elicit all the information from the Contractor and conclude the matter.Read more